5 Podcasts to Play Alongside the Olympics This Week

1 month, 17 days ago

Unfortunately, its tricky to watch the Olympics or follow the most recent Trump social media exploits while on the job.( While actually doing the job, that is .) Fortunately, your commute offer valuable catch-up hour. This week, cue up these podcasts for the audio diaries of Claressa Shields, who won the first womens gold medal for middleweight boxing in 2012 at 16 years old, and a lively debate over how much teen Tumblrs and tweets will matter when a generation who grew up with social media runs for office. Thats not all–your commute can also include the family legacy of traveling salesmen, 3,000 self-righteous beatniks, and an opu about urban development activist Jane Jacobs.

Radio Diaries , “From Flint to Rio”

In 2012, 16 -year-old middleweight Claressa Shields won gold, in the first year that womens boxing stimulated it to the Olympics.( She’ll defend her title in the ring on Aug. 17.) Boxing was the last all-male event in the Olympics, and sexism still predominates the sport. Shields speaks candidly about her experiences as a female boxer growing up in Flint, Michigan before and after winning the gold, facing prescribed gender norms from her parent, her coach, and USA boxing officers, who suggested that she tone down her enthusiasm for the physicality of the athletic to get sponsorships.

In 2012, 16 -year-old middleweight Claressa Shields won gold, in the first year that womens boxing constructed it to the Olympics.( She’ll defend her title in the ring on Aug. 17.) Boxing was the last all-male event in the Olympics, and sexism still predominates the sport. Shields speaks candidly about her experiences as a female boxer growing up in Flint, Michigan before and after winning the gold, facing prescribed gender norms from her father, her coach, and USA boxing officials, who suggested that she tone down her enthusiasm for the physicality of the athletic to get sponsorships.

Flash Forward , “Revenge of the Retweet”

Teenage poetry and high school social theories are painful for anyone to read.( If youre in the mood for that various kinds of schadenfreude, listen to the excellent Mortified podcast .) But thats especially true for anyone who grew up with a LiveJournal or Facebook. Flash Forward investigates the political ramifications of our digital histories: How will Kim Kardashian fan Tumblrs and racist tweets come back to haunt political nominees in 2046? Plus, an interview with Laura Olin, who ran Obamas Twitter during his presidential campaigns, onhow Americans are relaxing their standards about a politicians previous beliefs.

Teenage poetry and high school social hypothesis are painful for anyone to read.( If youre in the mood for that various kinds of schadenfreude, listen to the excellent Mortified podcast .) But thats especially true for anyone who grew up with a LiveJournal or Facebook. Flash Forward explores the political ramifications of our digital histories: How will Kim Kardashian fan Tumblrs and racist tweets come back to haunt political candidates in 2046? Plus, an interview with Laura Olin, who ran Obamas Twitter during his presidential campaigns, onhow Americans are relaxing their standards about a legislators previous beliefs.

Placemakers , “Jane Jacobs”

In its first episode, Placemakers , the Slate podcast analyze people who shape their communities and spaces, looks at Jane Jacobs. In the 1950 s, Jacobs criticized urban renewal endeavors as ruining the American downtown, successfully defending her West Village neighborhood from a cross-city freeway. This inaugural episode also featuresconversations with imaginary acquaintances and an opera about Robert Moses. Listen here.

Credit: Slate

In its first episode, Placemakers , the Slate podcast study people who shape their communities and spaces, looks at Jane Jacobs. In the 1950 s, Jacobs blamed urban renewal endeavors as ruining the American downtown, successfully defending her West Village neighborhood from a cross-city freeway. This inaugural episode also featuresconversations with imaginary acquaintances and an opu about Robert Moses. Listen here.

ARRVLS , “My Carnie Family”

Whats it like to grow up in a family business based around the Shamwow? Listen in on the life lessons learned by the child of a travelling salesman, featuring sauna pants, Oxiclean, and color-changing markersplus, a highlight reel of the legends of the state fair, and how to decide when to give up the patter and strike out from the family trade. Listen here .

Credit: ARRVLS

Whats it like to grow up in a family business based around the Shamwow? Listen in on the life lessons learned by the child of a traveling salesman, featuring sauna pants, Oxiclean, and color-changing markersplus, a highlight reel of the legends of the state fair, and how to decide when to give up the patter and strike out from the family trade. Listen here .

Between the Liner Notes , “3, 000 Beatniks Riot in Village”

On April 9, 1961, the folk singers of Washington Square Park protested against the New York City Department of Parks andRecreation to defend their right to play. Listen to Izzy Young, who led the 3,000 rioting beatniks, tell the story of that dayand hear how the same conflict between musicians and New York City government played out in 2011. Featuring excellent 1960 s archival audio of outraged, heavily accented bohemian New Yorkers.

On April 9, 1961, the folk singer of Washington Square Park protested against the New York City Department of Parks andRecreation to defend their right to play. Listen to Izzy Young, who led the 3,000 rioting beatniks, tell the story of that dayand hear how the same conflict between musicians and New York City government played out in 2011. Featuring excellent 1960 s archival audio of outraged, heavily accented bohemian New Yorkers.

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Little Girl’s Hamster Won’t Move For Three Days And The Reason Why Is Incredible!

1 month, 24 days ago

Hamsters usually maintain to themselves and have a tendency to hide. Their world is filled with giants and cats.

Via: @eeveeluti0n

They maintain to themselves and are so quite that it’s almost never normal for them to take a trip to the veterinarians. Luckily for us, Twitter user @eeveeluti0n‘s younger sister is a veterinary student and was able to tell us the story of the Hamster and the veterinarian.

A hamster was brought to the vet after it’s owner, a young girl consider that it was sitting motionless on the side of the enclosure, for about 3 days.


Via: @eeveeluti0n

The girl had also said that the hamster get out of it’s cage a few days before, and was found under the fridge, very frightened.


Via: @eeveeluti0n

Luckily it was a happy narrative, and yes a weird one as well! But at least the hamster is well and back to it’s normal self!

Mia Khalifa Gets Trolled By Twitter After She Posts That She’d Rather ‘Date a Vegan Than A Cowboys Fan’

2 months, 12 days ago

Mia Khalifa of, uh, ‘internet fame’ took to twitter yesterday to prove her loyalty to the Washington Redskins by declaring that she’d rather date ‘a vegan than a Cowboys fan’. While we don’t condone dating vegans, that’s good news for any of you vegan bros out there.

Twitter had a little fun at her expense over this one, but we’re gonna go ahead and say that we’d be happy to take Mia any day. To be honest, you really shouldn’t be dating vegans OR Cowboys fans.

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Twitter decided to have a little fun at her expenditure:

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Bonus Mia:

Via: twitter

Pushing to record: A creator’s eulogy for Vine

2 months, 16 days ago

Peter Heacock, who joined Vine in 2013 and started a group called Unpopular Now, shares why he loved the mobile app .
Image: photo courtesy of peter heacock

I first opened Vine in January 2013 and was transfixed.

The Popular Now page was awash with interesting experimentations in animation, art and storytelling. At the time I was a filmmaker who was trying and failing to get my work considered on the internet. I wanted to go viral. 6 seconds? No problem Ive get this.

I began to experiment.

About two weeks in, I was commuting to run and posted this. It reached the top of the platform in two hours. I checked every 15 minutes to make sure it was still there. Get insured. Get noticed. Interacting with people whom I had never fulfilled. Shouting out into the void I AM HERE and for the first time, people hearing the shout.

Baby had gone viral. I had taken my first step into a world that would change my life forever.

Vine is a beautiful piece of design. Push to record. Remove thumb from screen to stop. Fill up 6.5 seconds, title and post the loop. With simple tools come the tricks: Tap the screen precisely for single frame animation. Shoot reverse shot for dialogues and comedic scenes. The seamless loop( corypoppins ).

And the mother of them all Assistive Touch( Shout out to KeelayJams) where you could set a timer, walk in front of the camera and record yourself.

And jailbreaking phones to hack the program( Lunar Mayor ).

Or standing in the cold to tap a screen at precise increments( GooRee ).

Then came vinemagic and the #88C crew who summoned early George Mileau with trick edits.

Meanwhile competition on the Popular Now page was get heated, and props and production value was ramping up. Comedy was explosion like lemons from a gaping mouth. Collaboration became key. The Folks in New York and LA were actually getting together to build vines. The digital was become organic. We were becoming friends! Social Media actually became social.

Some really funny Vines were made.

Some truly random Vines as well.

I met so many people in those early days largely on Facebook actually. I had a young son at the time, and my periods soothing him in the middle of the night were illuminated by the light of my phone and nelw friends. It was like being back at movie school. Everyone was friendly, interesting and inspired.

I had an idea: Why not get together under one flag? We could call it Unpopular Now.” For two weeks, we posted in secret. We unveiled the site on June 13, 2013. unPOP generated challenges #unPOPmashup, #unPOPidol, #unPOPremake. People contributed, more friends were built, more talent discovered. The community grew.

Twitter reached out to see if we were interested in working with brands. I could make money from this little app? Are you kidding? I need insurance? Ill get it. Need to be incorporated? Done. Within four months, I had quit my job and was a full-time Viner. Three years later we look like this.

I taught myself how be a stop motion animator. I asked my Vine friends about rigs and motion and tricks. We were getting better.

Others were get downright famous. Marcus Johns staged the first #VineMeetup and was greeted by hundreds.

Jerome and Nash went to Iceland and were nearly trampled.

I attained so many that Im proud of. Here are a few πŸ˜› TAGEND

It was all occur. The selfie camera was turned on and Android users were introduced, and the boy brands began to take over. Magcon held events and jumped around onstage to adoring 11 -year old-girls. People humped furniture to R& B songs.

We were getting better at art and narrative and slapstick and PR and personal branding. I constructed Vines with a gorilla and my son was not scared.

I got my first big check, and I finally realise I could make a living doing this. People were watching my work. My friends and I had an audience.

Sometimes there would be pauses and rumblings of Vine being dead, but then it would come roaring back with the vibrant LNPP community posting amazing challenges until early in the morning. AllNaturalVines kept the old-school spirit of Vine alive much past the advent of the upload. Tony Besides fabricated the daily fiction vlog. The seamless loop by Corey. The loveable, creepy Jess. The forever viral meme queens of Anne and Alicia. The artestry of Origiful. Forever Funny Dads. Simply Sylvio. Justin Terio. The Lopriores. The consistently killer content of Jerome, Rudy, Nick, Marcus. The music of Trench, Leslie, Linda. The community of unPOP grew and the app was more vibrant than ever.

And then something happened. Everyone got really good at content. Other platforms wanted that content. Snapchat unveiled Tale. Insta introd video. YouTube became crazy profitable and some inventors began to see if they could make longer content elsewhere. And heres where it gets tricky.

Vine had the community, but it didnt have the dexterity to change. Rather than work on Vine messages, they could have developed a version of Snapchats story. They would have sparked more content for their app by placing vines together in a continuous piece. The listings was a terrible design for an app that had prided itself on flawless design. Owned by Twitter, it progressed like Twitter As in, didnt progress at all.

Perhaps the biggest single killer of Vine was taking out the competitor. If you had the best Vine in the world, you had the number 1 spot on the app. When they randomized the Popular Now page, this killed the competitive spirit. When they created channels, they only pushed the same creators over and over. They fell the ball on the finding good material and pushing it. Its not anyone on the staff to blame, their hands were tied with limited employees and an app that was yielding zero fund for a company with disappointing stock prices. The big celebrities moved to Snap, YouTube and Facebook en masse. They went to where the eyeballs were. People still posted to Vine, but it wasnt vibrant. Longer videos on Vine was unveiled too late despite the brilliant #CampUnplug. Integration to Twitter was clunky at best.

Twitter is great a few things but terrible at accommodating. In the word of social adaptation is everything. And so with a heavy heart I read that my favorite app ever will be killed.

I screamed. I did. I screamed “re going through” my feed and all of the videos that I admired. All of the experiences came inundating back. The memories. The community. Twitter burned down our house. We all get out just fine, but we lost our photo albums, our notebooks, our computers with years of work. Its lost in the ashes of Vine.

I cant understand how they couldnt fulcrum. To incorporate Vine into Twitter. To reinvent Vine, an app that still resides in so many phones. It seems to be about the money. And sometimes a match must be lit to save a larger company.

But heres the important point: we escaped the building intact and alive with memories and experience. When we look around, we are not Vine friends , now we are just friends. And that is the legacy of this little app. The genuine love for each other. We experienced three years of magic and sorrow. The occur of Nick Spears.

Ryan McHenry

Kwrkey

and Emma Greer.

So many friends, fans, some weddings and a Megalis baby on the way. It was a life we stimulated six seconds at a time. And that life and those relationships will exist forever.

unPOP will continue to make remarkable content for international brands. The competitor of Vine has taught me to make better commercials than a traditional commercial director. I know why people like and share content. Short commercials are the future, and I will continue to make a living making ads more entertaining.

But heres the real point: Social media is bullsh* t. It does not replace communities. It allows for us to interact within comfortable bubbles. It provides the illusion of intimacy and cooperation, but largely its a dumping ground for passive aggressive political views, advocacy and pseudo-knowledge that limits an understanding and respect of our common man and variation in beliefs.

Vine was different. We did it for the Vine because it was fun, creative and hemorrhaged out into the actual world. A world where we embraced our neighbors and our differences. We created magical with our hands and intellects and created real relationships through our actions. Vine is real. That is its legacy. I will miss the virtual community we construct but will continue to treasure the actual community we currently reside within.

I love you all. Continue to attain. Continue to breathe ingenuity into the void. I am endlessly excited to see what we generate. Make is what we do. #unPOP Forever. Viner Forever. Vine is dead. We are not.

Peter Heacock is founder and creative director of Unpopular Now, a branded content studio and production company that specializes in inducing stop-motion art. He joined Vine in January 2013 and formed unPOP a year later to help companies, including Armani, Budweiser, Target and Lancome, make creative content. You can follow him on Twitter @peteheacock and consider his work at www.unpopnow.com .

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#DeleteUber: how social media turned on Uber

2 months, 17 days ago

After Uber lifted surge pricing during a protest at New Yorks John F Kennedy airport against Trumps travel ban, censure online was swift

There was plenty to be angry about this weekend and many people is very much irate about the ride-hailing company Uber.

As news of Donald Trumps travel ban on Muslim-majority countries spread, protests sprang up at airports around the US. In support, the New York Taxi Employee Alliance called on its members to avoid John F Kennedy International Airport for one hour πŸ˜› TAGEND

NY Taxi Workers (@ NYTWA)

NO PICKUPS@ JFK Airport 6 PM to 7 PM today. Drivers stand in solidarity with thousands protesting inhumane& unconstitutional #MuslimBan.

January 28, 2017

After the ten-strike, Uber tweeted that upsurge pricing, which translates into higher fares at busy periods, had been switched off near JFK πŸ˜› TAGEND

Uber NYC (@ Uber_NYC)

Surge pricing has been turned off at #JFK Airport. This may result in longer wait times. Please be patient.

January 29, 2017

The reaction to Ubers strikebreaking was swift. #DeleteUber began trending, as people encouraging one another not only to delete the app from their phones, but also to cancel their Uber accounts.

jeremiah st cyr (@ MiahSaint)

@Uber_NYC xoxo pic.twitter.com/ cCwN2DH 0ef

January 29, 2017

Austin (@ peacoatseason)

I’m a Lyft guy now. Lyft baby !!!!! #deleteuber pic.twitter.com/ 585 D46XYSe

January 29, 2017

Josh Butler (@ JoshButler)

Scores of people are deleting Uber after the company serviced rides at JFK airport while taxis were striking against muslim forbid #deleteuber pic.twitter.com/ D8 cJMlxOxQ

January 29, 2017

Thanks to the companys many disagreements from its attitude to customer security to its use of surge pricing during the Sydney siege its was far from the first time the company had been excoriated on social media. However, the hashtags popularity demonstrated how American consumers are use a different tactic to depict their displeasure with what they view as Trump-supporting companies.

Dan OSullivan, or @Bro_Pair, was the first person to tweet the hashtag in direct response to Uber lifting surge pricing. He told the Daily Beast: Let this be a warning: if you are a corporation who thinks you will ride out Trump, and softly make money at his side, you will be made to pay a price.

Others criticised Ubers CEO, Travis Kalanick, pointing out he is a member of Trumps Strategic and Policy Forum . Posting to his Twitter and Facebook page, Kalanick called Trumps immigration and travel ban unjust. He also outlined supporting available to Uber drivers affected by the order.

In a statement, Uber said it had not intended to break up any ten-strike. We wanted people to know they could use Uber to get to and from JFK at normal prices.

Many of those angry at the company recommended switching to Lyft, an Uber competitor in the US. In response to Trumps executive order, Lyft announced it would be donating $1,000, 000 to the ACLU over the next four years to defend the constitution.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

People Are Eavesdropping The “Posh Mums of North London” and It’s Comedy Gold

3 months, 5 days ago

Read more: cheezburger.com

Twitter suspends American far-right activists’ accounts

3 months, 11 days ago

The move comes as the social network cracks down on hate speech on the site with new tools and features

Twitter has suspended the accounts of a number of American alt-right activists hours after announcing a renewed pushing to crack down on loathe speech.

Among the accounts removed were those of the self-described white-nationalist National Policy Institute, its publication, Radix, and its head Richard Spencer, as well as other prominent alt-right figures including Pax Dickinson and Paul Town.

Spencer, who according to anti-hate group SPLC calls for peaceful ethnic cleansing to halt the deconstruction of European culture, decried the bans as corporate Stalinism to right-wing news outlet Daily Caller.

Twitter is trying to airbrush the alt right out of existence, Spencer said. Theyre clearly afraid. They will fail! Members of the Reddit forum r/ altright “ve called the” move a purge.

Spencers ban is particularly notable, since he previously had a verified account on Twitter – the badge the company gives to noteworthy accounts to prove they are who they say they are. In the past, Twitter has stripped accounts of their verified status in the wake of abuse, as the company did with an editor at far-right news outlet Breitbartthis year, but the company does not appear to have previously acted so conclusively against an account it had once devoted what could be interpreted as a badge of approval.

A Twitter spokesman said the Twitter Rules prohibit violent threats, harassment, hateful conduct, and multiple account abuse, and we will take action on accounts infringing those policies.

The move came the same day that Twitter announced a new move against loathe speech and harassment on the site. The company announced new features intended to allow users to control what content appears in their notifications, but it also confirmed a change to its develop process for moderators on the site, and a new set of tools for reporting loathe speech.

Those changes were welcomed by users, but also seen as too little, too late. As with Facebooks clampdown on fake news on its social network, users construed the social network as ultimately realising that its platform was facilitating and emboldening the far right, but merely during the course of its week after the far-rights candidate of choice had won the US presidential election.

For former Twitter users, both those cast off the site due to their extreme positions, or those discontinuing Twitter in protest, a new social network is hoping to hoover them up instead. Gab advertises itself with the slogan Free speech for everyone, and features a green frog as its logo. Webcomic character Pepe the Frog was added to an online abhor symbol database in September owing to the figures co-option as an alt-right icon.

In a statement, Gab said: We are a free-speech website and nothing more. Gab is open to all users, regardless of their political beliefs, ideology and moral positions. Our mission is to set people first and to foster discourse without hindrance and proscription, as is occurring throughout the online community.

We use a frog, because it has long been a symbol of fertility, creation, going back to the ancients. Its seen as a emblem of prosperity.

So far, though, the service has just 12,000 users, stimulating it small in comparison to other far-right meeting place such as Stormfront.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Hilarious Twitter Exchange Between Writers About Hypothetical Serial Killer Scenario Is a Damn Masterpiece

4 months, 13 days ago

Anyone else ready for the sequel to this already? These guys truly outdid themselves. Fucking gold right here.

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Debunked: The Photo Of Obama With A Speech Balloon Saying Islam Is My Main Thing Has Been Proven To Be Doctored

4 months, 18 days ago

In an age where information can be spread to millions of people within seconds, its often difficult to separate fact from fiction. That was surely the suit a few months ago when a controversial photo of President Obama began to circulate online, with many insisting that the image was the real, unedited deal. But today that painting was officially debunked: The photo of Obama with a speech balloon saying Islam is my main thing has been proven to be doctored.

Wow. This is a good reminder to take everything you watch on the internet with a grain of salt!

Take a look at the photo in question above. In it, you can clearly see Obama proudly declaring his unshakeable Islamic faith.

At first glance, the photo looks like pretty clear evidence that Obama may be Muslim and corroborates the mistrusts of his most far-right critics, who insist the president has been dishonest with the public about his true religious beliefs. But when the image ran viral on Twitter, one user pointed out a possible sign of doctoring:

Many users agreed that the photo appeared to have been manipulated in some way and asked for an expert to weigh in. A graphic designer named Brendan McCann, whose Twitter bio says hes been in the industry for over a decade, promptly answered the call.

But it was Snopes that officially put the matter to rest. After scouring the internet far and wide, they were able to dig up the original version of the photograph, taken during one of the presidents official White House photo ops, and theres no speech balloon upholding the training courses of the Quran anywhere in sight.

Take a look at the two images side by side to see how the effect was attained:

Well, there you have it. It looks like whoever made this image took some of the space from above the presidents head and used it to overlay the speech balloon on top. Its a powerful impact, but its definitely not real. Remember: When it comes to the internet, always question your sources!

Read more: www.clickhole.com

Watch this man’s hilariously awkward attempt to hide from a Tv camera

4 months, 28 days ago

If you’re somewhere you’re not meant to be, the last thing you want to see is a massive Tv camera pointed in your direction.

Just take “the mens” holding the phone in the video below, taken from a post-game interview with Alabama’s head coach Nick Saban on Sunday πŸ˜› TAGEND

Oh. Dear.

We don’t know exactly why the guy wanted to hide from the camera, but if his aim was to slip off without anyone noticing it clearly didn’t work. The clip was shared on Twitter on Monday, and it’s since racked up over 25,000 retweets.

So many retweets, in fact, that the man himself — sports journalist Manuel D. DeLeon — eventually came forward.

Luckily, DeLeon clearly watched the funny side of the whole thing.

The lesson: if you’re trying to escape a camera in non-suspicious fashion, don’t hold gazing back at it.

WATCH: Andy Murray casually reminds reporter that female tennis players do exist

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