History vs. Henry VIII – Mark Robinson and Alex Gendler

6 hours ago

Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/history-vs-henry-viii-mark-robinson-and-alex-gendler He was a powerful king whose break with the church of Rome would forever change the course of English history. But was he a charismatic reformer who freed his subjects from a corrupt establishment or a bullying tyrant who used Parliament for his own personal gain? Mark Robinson and Alex Gendler put this controversial figure on trial in History vs. Henry VIII. Lesson by Mark Robinson and Alex Gendler, directed by Brett Underhill. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Elizabeth Parker, Sai Krishna Koyoda, Samuel Barbas, Maxwell Ingram, Victoria Soler-Roig, Abdulmateen Aderinto, Pavel Maksimov, Barbara Younker, Cyrus Garay, Yvette Mocete, Mike Azarkman, Patricia Alves Panagides, William Biersdorf, Michael Aquilina, Vinamr, FireWolfLasers , Kshitij Shah, Mohammad Said, Teach Me Dine -Navajo Language, Victoria Veretilo, Rebecca Reineke, Kyanta Yap, Brandon Thomas, Lewis Westbury, Ojas Kapoor, Mirzat Turap, Jaime Arriola, Emilia Alvarado, Javid Gozalov, Philipp Hiestand, Paul Beard, Deepak Iyer, Markus Goldhacker, Mihai Sandu, Keven Webb, Hendrik Mueller, Maurice Castonguay, Kristiyan Bonev, Maryam Dadkhah, Joshua Wasniewski, Michał Friedrich, Arlene Spiegelman, Doug Henry, Alick Au, denison martins fernandes, Daniel Nester, Richard A Berkley, Benjamin Chan, Dee Wei and Abdallah Absi.From: TED-Ed

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Wikimedia’s free photo database of artworks violates copyright, court rules

2 days ago

Wikimedia claims Swedish court decision means tourists who take selfies at famous landmarks and spread them online could be in violation of law

Swedens highest court on Monday found Wikimedia Sweden guilty of violating copyright laws by providing free access to its database of artwork photographs without the artists consent.

Wikimedia, part of the not-for-profit foundation which oversees Wikipedia among other online resources, has a database of royalty-free photographs that can be used by the public, for educational purposes or the tourism industry.

The Visual Copyright Society in Sweden (BUS), which represents painters, photographers, illustrators and designers among others, had sued Wikimedia Sweden for making photographs of their artwork displayed in public places available in its database, without their consent.

The Supreme Court found in favour of BUS, arguing that while individuals were permitted to photograph artwork on display in public spaces, it was an entirely different matter to make the photographs available in a database for free and unlimited use.

Such a database can be assumed to have a commercial value that is not insignificant. The court finds that the artists are entitled to that value, it wrote in a statement.

The amount of damages Wikimedia was to pay to BUS was to be determined by a Stockholm district court at a later date.

Wikimedia Sweden expressed disappointment at the ruling.

The Supreme Courts decision shows that we have a copyright law that is behind the times and insufficient faced with the digital reality we all live in, it said in a statement.

It noted that tourists who take selfies of themselves at famous landmarks and spread them on the Internet could be deemed in violation of copyright laws.

BUS meanwhile recalled that Wikimedia had refused to sign a licensing agreement that would have cost several thousand kronor per year (several hundred euros/dollars) and had instead chosen to spend hundreds of thousands of kronor on lawyers fees.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Can you solve the secret werewolf riddle? – Dan Finkel

3 days ago

Practice more problem-solving at https://brilliant.org/TedEd/ Signup to receive the bonus riddle’s solution: https://brilliant.org/TedEdWerewolf/ You’re on the trail of a werewolf that’s been terrorizing your town. After months of detective work, you’ve narrowed your suspects to one of five people. You’ve invited them to dinner with a simple plan: to slip a square of a rare antidote into each of their dinners. Unfortunately, you only have one square left. Can you divide it into perfect fifths and cure the werewolf? Dan Finkel shows how. Lesson by Dan Finkel, directed by Artrake Studio. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Ken, James Bruening, Michael Braun-Boghos, Ricardo Diaz, Kack-Kyun Kim, Artem Minyaylov, Danny Romard, Yujing Jiang, Stina Boberg, Anthony Wiggins, Hoai Nam Tran, Joe Sims, David Petrovič, Chris Adriaensen, Lowell Fleming, Sunny Patel, Vijayalakshmi , Uday Kishore, Aidan Forero, Leen Mshasha, Allan Hayes, Vaibhav Mirjolkar, Tony, Michelle, Katie and Josh Pedretti, Erik Biemans, Gaurav Mathur, Hans Peng, Tekin Gültekin, Hector Quintanilla, Penelope Misquitta, Ravi S. Rāmphal, Emma Moyse, Fahad Nasser Chowdhury, Marin Kovachev, Roman Pinchuk, Daniel Huerga, Maria Lerchbaumer, Edgar Campos Barrachina, Dianne Palomar, The Brock, Curtis Light, Ernest Chow, Liana Switzer, Maija Chapman, Pamela Harrison, Mighterbump , Beatriz Inácio, Robert Hargis, Mircea Sîrbu, Irindany Sandoval and William Bravante.From: TED-Ed

Source: http://tz2d.me/?c=hKk

Worried About Robots Taking Your Job? Learn Spreadsheets

3 days ago

Musing on the future of the economy earlier this year, Bill Gates warned of smart machines replacing human workers and suggested a tax on robots. A new study of how technology is changing American jobs suggests workers are most immediately challenged by more common technology that Gates himself bears much responsibility for, such as Microsoft Office.

The new study from the Brookings Institution used government data on work tasks to track how use of digital tools changed in a wide range of occupations between 2002 and 2016. Use of digital technology, such as computers and spreadsheets, became more important to occupations of all kinds. But the most dramatic changes were felt in jobs traditionally least reliant on technology skills—think of home health aides and truck mechanics using computers to diagnose problems or record their work.

The Brookings’ study created a “digitalization” score for 545 occupations covering 90 percent of the economy, using government survey data that asks workers about their knowledge of computers, and how much they use them. In 2002, 56 percent of jobs scored low on Brookings’ digitalization scale; by 2016, only 30 percent did. Nearly two-thirds of new jobs created since 2010 required high or medium digital skills, the report says. That shift is problematic given America’s long-established deficit in basic digital skills, such as familiarity with spreadsheets or other workplace software, where US workers score well below other those from other advanced economies.

Share of US jobs by degree of digital content. Source: Brookings Institution

HOTLITTLEPOTATO

Overall, the Brookings report suggests the window of opportunity for workers without basic digital skills or a college degree is closing. “With the availability of jobs that require no to very low digital skills dwindling, economic inclusion is now contingent on digital readiness among workers,” says Mark Muro, a senior fellow at Brookings who led the study. “While tech empowers it also polarizes.” He recommends that companies, government officials, and educational groups invest in programs that train workers in basic digital workplace tools.

That diagnosis and proposed remedy stand in contrast to two common prescriptions for how to help the US economy adapt to technological change. Gates and many other tech executives suggest new government programs to support workers displaced by a coming generation of smart robots. In recent years there has been a swell of support, including from the Obama administration, for programs that teach people to code.

The new Brookings data suggests the US faces a more immediate, and perhaps less glamorous task. “Coding for all is not quite the right model,” says Muro. “It’s less sexy, but we need much broader exposure and mastery of humbler, everyday software.” Maybe not everyone needs to be a code slinger, but word processing and enterprise packages like Salesforce are hard to avoid.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai made a similar argument last month, when he launched a $1 billion educational program focused on helping workers skill up in workplace technology. Google employees will offer training in cities around the US. Naturally, they’ll highlight products such as GSuite, Google’s competitor to Microsoft office.

The digital-skills crunch has been a long time brewing. Erik Brynjolfsson, director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy, says that IT’s impact on US businesses surged in the mid-to-late ’90s—not coincidentally around the same time US median wages began to stagnate. In 1996, President Clinton announced a “national mission” to make all US children technologically literate by 21st Century. The Brookings report shows there is still a way to go. “We could have done a lot better,” says Brynjolfsson.

Brynjolfsson echoes Muro’s call for better educational efforts to widen the pool of workers with basic digital skills. He also says society’s poor track record at adjusting to the digital age shows we should be starting now to prepare workers for the next big shift, in which machines become capable of many tasks now done by humans. He recommends that, in addition to productivity software and coding skills, workers should be encouraged to develop their creativity and emotional intelligence—faculties believed to be among the toughest for software to acquire.

Jason Kloth, CEO of Ascend Indiana, an industry-led group that tries to improve workforce skills, generally agrees with Brynjolfsson’s long-term predictions that advanced automation will challenge workers of all kinds. But his organization has more immediate concerns. “We need to close the gap between demand and supply in the labor market today,” he says.

Ascend has collaborated with Brookings on research on workplace skills. The Indianapolis group’s initiative includes programs that help companies identify or create educational programs for workers. Kloth says he feels there’s more at stake than just the fortunes of local companies and workers. “I think that growing income inequality manifests in social and political unrest,” Kloth says. Spreadsheet training could—maybe should—be a political issue.

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How Apple Lost Its Place in the Classroom

3 days ago

In Chicago yesterday, Apple CEO Tim Cook stepped into the auditorium at Lane Technical College Prep High School and told an audience about the future of education.

It was Apple’s first education-focused event since 2012. Back then, Apple still had the lion’s share of the education market—over half of devices shipped to schools that year ran on iOS or Mac OS—and it had a new plan to replace raggedy, expensive textbooks with cheaper digital versions made to read on a tablet. The iPad was two years old, and while it was pricey, it seemed poised to change the way students could learn.

The company had been in classrooms for years, as far back as the Apple IIe, which Apple donated to schools by the thousands in the early 1980s. Apple wanted to bring its devices into every school in America, to usher in an era of computer literacy and education. And perhaps, to introduce Apple-branded devices to kids early enough to make them lifelong customers.

For a while, that worked. Apple designed a heap of devices over the years specifically for use in the classroom. For generations of American school kids, learning to type, write papers, and research school projects was something you did on a Mac.

Not anymore. Today’s classrooms are powered by Chromebooks and, to a lesser extent, Windows laptops. These are sturdy, versatile, and inexpensive machines that have revolutionized how schools incorporate technology into their classrooms. Steve Jobs wanted to put a computer in the hands of every student. But Chromebooks—not Macbooks—have made that vision a reality.

Gaining a foothold in the classroom isn’t just a way to sell thousands of computers in bulk. It’s a way to capture a generation of young people and teach them what a computer is.

Last year, Chromebooks made up a whopping 58 percent of computing devices shipped to schools. That’s up from 50 percent in 2015, and 38 percent in 2014, according to data from market research firm Futuresource. New Apple devices, meanwhile, dropped to 19 percent—down from 50 percent in 2014. Even Microsoft is gaining an edge with its Windows 10 Laptops, designed for use in schools with the palatable price point of $189.

So Tuesday's event wasn't just a standard product announcement. It was Apple's chance to reinsert itself into the American classroom. Some speculated that the company would introduce a heavily discounted iPad, and new software to rival the likes of Google Classroom, a popular and free web service that helps teachers grade assignments and share information with their class. When Apple's executives took the stage, they did show off a discounted iPad—but at $299 for schools (versus $329 for consumers), it wasn't the price point many had hoped for. This cheaper iPad now supports Apple's Pencil—but of course, that’s sold separately ($99 for consumers, $89 for schools). And there’s no Smart Connector, the port that makes it possible to plug-in accessories like keyboards (also sold separately).

Apple execs danced around the auditorium stage showing how to annotate digital books and create doodles using the Pencil. They debuted a new app, Schoolwork, for teachers to dole out digital assignments, and updated an old app, Classroom, that lets teachers check in on how students are using their iPads. As with any Apple event, this one was full of sparkle and shine. But it's hard to ignore the economics of what Apple is offering: The iPad is still twice the price of a Chromebook, which start at $149, and almost twice the price of Microsoft’s Windows 10 laptop, which costs $189.

"Money is really a big issue," says John Ross, an education technology consultant. "If you're a school district with over 45,000 students, then $299 times that many kids adds up to a lot. Whatever’s cheap and whatever works—that carries more weight than brand loyalty."

Chromebooks, which have come to dominate classrooms, gained popularity around 2012. While Apple was pushing its iPad into schools, the Chromebook offered something simpler, and much more affordable. The laptops run on Chrome OS, which Google licenses to multiple hardware vendors for cheap or free. That creates competition and keeps costs low. For schools, there's no better selling point; Chromebooks are about as cheap as it gets.

But it’s not just price. Chromebooks are also rugged and durable, built to last class after class of kids whacking at their keyboards. They actually have keyboards—something Ross says is basically essential for any classroom above the third grade. Chromebooks update automatically, over Wi-Fi. Everything gets stored in the Cloud, which makes it easy to move between devices and work collaboratively.

For $299, you can give a kid an iPad—without a Pencil, without a Bluetooth keyboard—with a suite of brand new educational apps that students and teachers alike will have to learn how to use. For the same $299, you could buy two Chromebooks, stocked with the suite of Google products (Docs, Gmail, and Classroom) that everyone already likes and understands.

Gaining a foothold in the classroom isn’t just a way to sell thousands of computers in bulk. It’s a way to capture a generation of young people and teach them what a computer is. Google has taught thousands of young people how to use email, share documents, make presentations, and store files on one simple operating system, which shows up on all kinds of hardware. When it comes time for these kids to head off to college and buy laptops of their own, guess where they’ll look first.

Apple's strategy seems to be showing educators all that its machines can do—from products that improve classroom organization to applications that bring textbook material to life in augmented reality. One demonstration Tuesday involved a new app that allows students to dissect a digital frog in AR. But other companies are working toward that future too. Microsoft, in partnership with education company Pearson, is developing a mixed reality curriculum aimed at schools and sells its HoloLens headset at a 10 percent discount to students. The difference? Microsoft also offers a no-frills laptop designed to help teachers and students get through the day.

As the Apple team prepared to set up its keynote at Lane Technical College Prep High School, the school sent around an announcement about the event: "Apple is making some great upgrades to our facilities, like updating the auditorium, refinishing areas inside and out, replacing lighting, touching up paint, and more," a schoolwide email read. "And the great news is that they’ll leave behind all of the improvements they make."

In most schools, basic infrastructure upgrades for little-to-no cost count for more than new technology that lets you dissect a frog in augmented reality. But Apple’s competitors already know that.

Read more:

Secondary school places for all ‘undeliverable’, councils warn – BBC News

4 days ago
Image caption The school places squeeze is about to hit secondary schools

The legal duty of councils in England to ensure that every child has a school place could soon become undeliverable, local authorities have warned.

With a population bulge about to hit secondary schools, councils want powers to open new maintained schools and to compel academies to expand.

Thousands of children are due to hear on Tuesday which secondary school they will attend from September.

However the government says the warning amounts to “scaremongering”.

The population bulge which has put primary schools under pressure will start hitting secondary schools this year, according to official figures.

Last year councils had to provide 2,740,000 secondary school places, but this will rise to 3,287,000 by 2024, the figures predict.

Free schools

The Local Government Association (LGA) says councils will struggle to meet this demand under the current system.

Under government rules, all new state schools must be “free schools”, outside local authority control.

But the LGA wants councils to be able to open schools themselves and to require academies, which make up 60% of secondary schools and decide their own admissions policies, to expand as needed.

The LGA says councils have already created an extra 300,000 primary school places but face a new challenge as pupils reach secondary level.

“Councils will do everything they can to rise to the challenge of ensuring no child goes without a place,” said Roy Perry, chairman of the LGA’s Children and Young People Board.

A Department for Education spokesman said the government had confidence in the current system.

“Where local authorities identify the need for a new school they are required by law to invite proposals to run a new free school and then forward these to the department to decide who would be best placed to do this,” the spokesman said.

“We would encourage councils to work with regional schools commissioners, using their combined local knowledge, to identify top sponsors for new schools in their area, and we are confident there are enough quality sponsors to meet demand.”

Image caption A population bulge has put already pressure on primary places

But councils said they often struggled to find sponsors for free schools in time to meet demand for places.

Birmingham City Council, where the supply of secondary places is already tight, called the current system “a mess”.

The council found secondary places for all pupils who applied last year, but 11% of those were in another local authority area and 6.6% were in schools which families had not included on their list of six preferences.

Birmingham’s cabinet member for children’s services, Brigid Jones, said the council spent “a lot of time working out what we need, but convincing some academies and free schools to open in the right places at the right times can be a nightmare”.

‘Not a surprise’

Mary Bousted, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, accused the government of letting children down.

“The increase in pupil numbers is not a surprise,” she said.

“The free school experiment has failed in its most important purpose; ensuring every child has a school place.”

The National Union of Teachers said it was “quite clear” that local authorities needed the authority and funding to open new schools.

“Failure to do this will result in yet more chaos, children being taught in Portakabins, larger class sizes and many having to take places in schools away from their neighbourhood,” said general secretary Christine Blower.

Solicitors Simpson Millar, who specialise in admissions appeals, said their own research indicated that demand for secondary places this year would begin to outstrip supply.

Emma Pearmaine, the firm’s director of family services, said missing out on a preferred school place could be detrimental, particularly in cases of family breakdown or where children had special educational needs.

Read more: www.bbc.co.uk

Can you solve the secret werewolf riddle? – Dan Finkel

5 days ago

Practice more problem-solving at https://brilliant.org/TedEd/ Signup to receive the bonus riddle’s solution: https://brilliant.org/TedEdWerewolf/ You’re on the trail of a werewolf that’s been terrorizing your town. After months of detective work, you’ve narrowed your suspects to one of five people. You’ve invited them to dinner with a simple plan: to slip a square of a rare antidote into each of their dinners. Unfortunately, you only have one square left. Can you divide it into perfect fifths and cure the werewolf? Dan Finkel shows how. Lesson by Dan Finkel, directed by Artrake Studio. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Ken, James Bruening, Michael Braun-Boghos, Ricardo Diaz, Kack-Kyun Kim, Artem Minyaylov, Danny Romard, Yujing Jiang, Stina Boberg, Anthony Wiggins, Hoai Nam Tran, Joe Sims, David Petrovič, Chris Adriaensen, Lowell Fleming, Sunny Patel, Vijayalakshmi , Uday Kishore, Aidan Forero, Leen Mshasha, Allan Hayes, Vaibhav Mirjolkar, Tony, Michelle, Katie and Josh Pedretti, Erik Biemans, Gaurav Mathur, Hans Peng, Tekin Gültekin, Hector Quintanilla, Penelope Misquitta, Ravi S. Rāmphal, Emma Moyse, Fahad Nasser Chowdhury, Marin Kovachev, Roman Pinchuk, Daniel Huerga, Maria Lerchbaumer, Edgar Campos Barrachina, Dianne Palomar, The Brock, Curtis Light, Ernest Chow, Liana Switzer, Maija Chapman, Pamela Harrison, Mighterbump , Beatriz Inácio, Robert Hargis, Mircea Sîrbu, Irindany Sandoval and William Bravante.From: TED-Ed

Source: http://tz2d.me/?c=hKk

CERN Just Released 300 Terabytes Worth Of Data To The Public

5 days ago

If youve ever dreamedof working on the largest experiment in the world, you can nowmake that dream a realityfrom the comfort of your own home. CERN has just released more than 300 terabytes (TB) of high-quality open data from its CMS collaboration.

The data includes 100 TB collected at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) by the CMS detector in 2011. This includes raw datasetsused by the scientists, as well as simplified datasets that can be analyzed with very little computational power, and even simulated datawhich helps the researchers to know what to expect from the experiment.

The release is an effort by CMS to have its data publicly available. CERN is funded by government money from its 29 member states, so by releasing this information,the general public can actually see what their money is spent on. The collaboration previously released 27 TB of data in 2014.

All the data can be easily visualized in the CERN virtual machine. CMS Collaboration

As scientists, we should take the release of data from publicly funded research very seriously, says Salvatore Rappoccio, a CMS physicist, in a statement.In addition to showing good stewardship of the funding we have received, it also provides a scientific benefit to our field as a whole. While it is a difficult and daunting task with much left to do, the release of CMS data is a giant step in the right direction.

The data released also hasmany scientific benefits beyond being a good public engagement tool. The data can now be accessed by other scientists, who can take a fresh look at the informationand maybe discover something that has been missed so far. The data will also have a huge impact as an educational tool, as the CERN virtual machine canbe downloaded and used to help trainundergraduates and high school studentsto be the next generation of particle physicists.

The CMS data is available on the CERN open data portal. CMS stands for Compact Muon Solenoid and is one of two general-purpose experiments looking for potential new particles produced through proton collisions. CMS and its counterpart ATLAS were responsible for the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012.

Photo Gallery

Read more: www.iflscience.com

11 activists, including local Amnesty International chiefs, on trial in Turkey

6 days ago

Istanbul (CNN)Eleven activists have gone on trial for terror offenses in Turkey — including two local Amnesty International chiefs and two foreigners — as the country continues with a purge that has gutted institutions in all areas of public life.

The activists are accused of aiding three groups that Turkey describes as “armed terrorist organizations” and could face up to 15 years in prison.
Amnesty International slammed the allegations as “entirely baseless.”
    “From the moment of their detentions, it has been clear that these are politically motivated prosecutions aimed at silencing critical voices within Turkey,” Amnesty International’s Europe director, John Dalhuisen, said in a statement.
    Dozens of protesters gathered outside the courthouse to support the activists and called for their release.
    Ten of the activists — including Amnesty’s Turkey director, İdil Eser — were arrested in a police raid on July 5 in Istanbul while attending a workshop on wellbeing and digital security, Amnesty said. The 11th is Amnesty’s Turkey chair, Taner Kılıç, who was arrested a month earlier and is being tried in an additional case.
    Among the 11 are German citizen Peter Frank Steudtner, a non-violence and wellbeing trainer, and Swedish citizen Ali Gharavi, an IT strategy consultant, who join dozens of other foreign nationals detained in Turkey’s purge.
    The indictment alleges that the workshop was an unauthorized meeting at which the activists were orchestrating an uprising. It also alleged that the cybersecurity techniques they discussed — such as securing information in mobile phones if the devices are seized by police and how to encrypt information — conformed “to secrecy rules of terrorist organizations.”
    Amnesty called on the judge to throw out the case.
    “Without substance or foundation the Turkish authorities have tried and failed to build a case against İdil, Taner and the other nine human-rights activists. It took the prosecutor more than three months to come up with nothing. It should not take the judge more than half an hour to dismiss the case against them,” Amnesty said.
    The rights group said that the 11 activists were carrying out standard human-rights protection activities, such as “appealing to stop the sale of tear gas, making a grant application and campaigning for the release of hunger-striking teachers.”

    ByLock app controversy

    The activists are accused of aiding the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) — which is considered a terrorist organization by Turkey, the US and the EU — and FETO, a term used by the Turkish government to describe supporters of Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen. Gulen lives in exile in the US and Turkey blames him for orchestrating the attempted coup, which he has denied.
    Kılıç is also accused in a separate case of being a member of FETO. If he is convicted, he could face 17½ years in prison.
    In that case, prosecutors’ evidence against Kılıç centers around his alleged downloading of ByLock, a widely available phone app used for encrypted messaging that the indictment says is also used by Gulen supporters.
    Amnesty said it had commissioned two independent forensic analyses of Taner’s phone that found no trace of Bylock on the device.
    Wednesday’s trial, and several other cases, have caused concern in the West over the erosion of civil liberties in the country under President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s rule.
    Erdoganspearheaded a vote this year on constitutional change that granted him sweeping new powers that could cement his leadership until 2029.
    He has overseen the extension of the country’s state of emergency several times, which has allowed Ankara and the courts to continue with a crackdown that has transformed media organizations, rights groups and the country’s educational institutions.

    Read more: www.cnn.com

    How far would you have to go to escape gravity? – Rene Laufer

    One week ago

    Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-far-would-you-have-to-go-to-escape-gravity-rene-laufer Every star, black hole, human being, smartphone and atom are all constantly pulling on each other due to one force: gravity. So why don’t we feel pulled in billions of different directions? And is there anywhere in the universe where we’d be free of its pull? Rene Laufer details the inescapability of gravity. Lesson by Rene Laufer, directed by TED-Ed. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! rakesh Katragadda, Sergi Páez, Jørgen Østerpart, Cindy O., Nicu Boanda, Reagen O’Connor, Sabrina Gonzalez, Dino , Hadi Salahshour, Clement , Nick Debenedictis, Abdullah Altuwaijri, Jessie McGuire, Divina Grace Dar Santos, Brian Richards, Farah Abdelwahab, Mikhail Shkirev, Malcolm Callis, David Matthew Ezroj, Ever Granada, fatima kried, Begum Tutuncu, Lala Arguelles, Mehmet Sencer KARADAYI, Christian Kurch, SungGyeong Bae, Luis Felipe Ruiz Langenscheidt, Joe Huang, Rohan Gupta, Senjo Limbu, Martin Lau, Robson Martinho, Cailin Ramsey, Aaron Henson, John Saveland, Nicolle Fieldsend-Roxborough, ReuniteKorea, Venkat Venkatakrishnan, QIUJING L BU, Yoga Trapeze Wanderlust, Jaron Blackburn, Alejandro Cachoua, Thomas Mungavan, Edla Paniguel, Anna-Pitschna Kunz, Tim Armstrong, Erika Blanquez, Ricki Daniel Marbun, zjweele13 and Judith Benavides.From: TED-Ed

    Source: http://tz2d.me/?c=hDR

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